Weird News This First-Grade Math Problem Is Stumping the Internet

19:05  18 may  2017
19:05  18 may  2017 Source:   Mental Floss

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According to the original poster AlmondShell, the bonus question was given to primary one, or first grade students, in Singapore. A similar problem can be found on the blog of math enthusiast G.R. Burgin.

Years ago, when a kid stumbled over a problem so tough they couldn't finish their math homework, they'd accept a less-than-perfect grade . Read more: Can You Solve This Math Problem That's Stumping the Whole Internet ? The first one is pretty simple.

The first-grade maths problem stumping the internet © Mental Floss/iStock The first-grade maths problem stumping the internet If you’ve ever fantasized about how much easier life would be if you could go back to elementary school, this math problem may give you second thoughts. The question first appeared on a web forum, Mashable reports, and after recently resurfacing, it’s been perplexing adults across social media.

Maths problem given to first-graders. © Provided by The Week Publications Maths problem given to first-graders.
According to the original poster AlmondShell, the bonus question was given to primary one, or first grade students, in Singapore. It instructs readers to “study the number pattern” and “fill in the missing numbers.” The puzzle, which comprises five numbers and four empty circles waiting to be filled in, comes with no further explanation.

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There are few things more embarrassing than failing to outsmart a six-year-old, but the parents of this first - grader were left stumped by his math homework – as were many other adults after the problem got shared on Facebook.

A bizarrely difficult math problem was released on the internet recently, that shows a grid of numbers stumping , even, the parents of the student who brought it home. It was a first grade math problem and was uploaded by The Holderness Family to their Facebook page.

Some forum members commented with their best guesses, while others expressed disbelief that this was a question on a kid’s exam. Commenter karrotguy illustrates one possible answer: Instead of looking for complex math equations, they saw that the figure in the middle circle (three) equals the amount of double-digit numbers in the surrounding quadrants (18, 10, 12). They filled out the puzzle accordingly.

Maths problem given to first-graders. © The Week Publications Maths problem given to first-graders.
A similar problem can be found on the blog of math enthusiast G.R. Burgin. His solution, which uses simple algebra, gets a little more complicated.

The math tests given to 6- and 7-year-olds in other parts of the world aren’t much easier. If your brain isn’t too worn out after the last one, check out this maddening problem involving trains assigned to students in the UK.

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Stephanie Mui, 17, is the youngest graduate this weekend at George Mason University“To solve it I remember I had to set up a system of algebraic equations and basically just solve them simultaneously,” said the 17-year-old from Fairfax.

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