Home & Garden Why having a shelf full of unread books is actually a good thing

08:53  27 december  2017
08:53  27 december  2017 Source:   House Beautiful (UK)

The 1 Thing This 9-Year-Old Kid Does Each Morning Will Make Your Day a Million Times Better

  The 1 Thing This 9-Year-Old Kid Does Each Morning Will Make Your Day a Million Times Better Lauren Cormier knows that it's important to teach your children lessons that they can carry with them for the rest of their lives - and looking at the glass half-full is an important one. But sometimes practicing what they preach is a challenge for parents, and Cormier learned the key to starting each day on a positive note from an unlikely source: her 9-year-old son. She shared her son's daily routine to her Facebook page, Oh, Honestly, so other families could give it a try: Last week my nine-year-old told me about a new habit he's starting to form.

As a reader and collector, I have way more books than I could read, but you’ve noted some great reasons why collecting books is a good thing . You will accumulate more knowledge and more books as you grow older, and the growing number of unread books on the shelves will look at you

An overstuffed bookcase (or e-reader) says good things about your mind. But if it's simply that your book reading in no way keeps pace with your book buying, I have good news Indeed, the more you know, the larger the rows of unread books . Let us call this collection of unread books an antilibrary.

Why everyone should have an 'antilibrary' at home © Getty Why everyone should have an 'antilibrary' at home Unless you're a bibliophile, many of us probably have a row of books on our shelves we've never read.

Chances are you stare at it every time you clean your house and wonder if you'll ever get to them. But it turns out, even if you don't read all of them in the next 10 years, you should still keep them.

Behold, the 'antilibrary'. Let us explain: Nassim Nicholas Taleb wrote a book called The Black Swan: The Impact of the Highly Improbable, and in it he explores Italian writer, Umberto Eco's, unique take on books. Eco dubbed the collection of books everyone owns, but hasn't read, 'antilibraries,' and says they actually keep people intellectually curious and humble.

The 1 Thing This 9-Year-Old Kid Does Each Morning Will Make Your Day a Million Times Better

  The 1 Thing This 9-Year-Old Kid Does Each Morning Will Make Your Day a Million Times Better Lauren Cormier knows that it's important to teach your children lessons that they can carry with them for the rest of their lives - and looking at the glass half-full is an important one. But sometimes practicing what they preach is a challenge for parents, and Cormier learned the key to starting each day on a positive note from an unlikely source: her 9-year-old son. She shared her son's daily routine to her Facebook page, Oh, Honestly, so other families could give it a try: Last week my nine-year-old told me about a new habit he's starting to form.

I don't really question why I have shelves full of books , and I don't mind I haven't read them all fore to aft. Read books are far less valuable than unread ones. All of my good books were given to friends or sold off, but I was trapped with a big shelf full of books that absolutely no one wanted.

Latest. Writers. Books . Videos. About. Submissions. How many lives and careers have changed for the better because of it? It’s a wonderful thing . Wikimedia Recently, Steve Patterson re-published an article on Thought Catalog titled, Why Cultural Appropriation Is Actually A Good Thing .

Tabel describes it this way in his book: 'A private library is not an ego-boosting appendage but a research tool. Read books are far less valuable than unread ones. The library should contain as much of what you do not know as your financial means, mortgage rates, and the currently tight real-estate market allows you to put there.'

He also goes on to say that it's inevitable that you'll accumulate more books (and knowledge) as you get older. But that's not a bad thing and shouldn't be a cause for stress. Having a row of books you haven't read will remind you that there is still much that you know know (yet). So instead of viewing it as a failure, view it as a source of inspiration and future learning.

And the next time someone asks why you haven't read a certain book yet, tell them it's an important part of your 'antilibrary.'

The weird thing you never noticed about airports

  The weird thing you never noticed about airports And how it could be making you spend moreBut there's so much we don't know about these places, like; what's behind all the no entry doors, how do all the bags make it to the right plane and why do all airport corridors slope slightly to the left?

I’ve had some books in my house for years and still not read them. I have two black half shelves I keep separate from Sometimes maybe I think about these unread books more than I think about the books I’ve read. I feel ashamed I was ever at a phase in my life when I actually bought this book .

I’ve had some books in my house for years and still not read them. I have two black half shelves I keep separate from Sometimes maybe I think about these unread books more than I think about the books I’ve read. I feel ashamed I was ever at a phase in my life when I actually bought this book .

Related: Classic covers: the fortune sitting on your bookshelf (provided by Lovemoney)

Are these books on your shelf?: You may not have thought too much of it when you bought your first Harry Potter book or that tattered copy of The Catcher in the Rye from a garage sale, but you might want to look again because they could be worth a small fortune. Here are some very valuable first editions and what they are worth, according to specialists AbeBooks.co.uk. Classic covers: the fortune sitting on your bookshelf

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The very different words men and women use to talk about love .
If you sometimes feel men and women speak a different language, you might be closer to the truth than you think. At least when it comes to love.New York Times journalists examined four years of love essays submitted to the paper, taking note of the author's gender. It would appear that stereotypes hold true when men and women write about love. Men are more likely to write about actions - such as "bomb", "hit" and "battle" - and women to talk about feelings - such as "agony", "hurt" and "resentment".

Source: http://uk.pressfrom.com/lifestyle/home-and-garden/-230580-why-having-a-shelf-full-of-unread-books-is-actually-a-good-thing/

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